Watching: ‘Lady Bird’.

BFFs.

Thursday night I joined a friend to see “Lady Bird” – we were especially excited after all the hype it got at the Golden Globes last weekend and wanted to catch it before it left theatres. I’d heard a little bit about it, and saw the film’s writer and director – Greta Gerwig – on an episode of “Watch What Happens Live” a few weeks back.

Here’s the official scoop on “Lady Bird” from IMDb: “Christine ‘Lady Bird’ MacPherson is a high school senior from the ‘wrong side of the tracks.’ She longs for adventure, sophistication, and opportunity, but finds none of that in her Sacramento Catholic high school. LADY BIRD follows the title character’s senior year in high school, including her first romance, her participation in the school play, and most importantly, her applying for college.”

Overall, I enjoyed the writing in this movie – it was much more comedic than I expected (I laughed a lot), and the wit was very on-point. There were definitely relatable aspects to this film: small-town girl wanting to get out and explore, family pulling together to make things happen, teenage angst, wanting to fit in, and young love. I can see why lots of people loved this movie.

But there were two things that really bothered me about it. For starters, the movie was said to have taken place in 2002 (said by Gerwig herself and in the movie’s description), but there was very little in the movie to give us a timestamp. In fact, many of the cues we were given were incorrect. The first thing I saw was Alanis Morissette’s “Hand in My Pocket” was playing on the radio. This song came out in 1995. As a very huge Alanis fan, I know radio stations were not putting “Hand in My Pocket” in regular rotation in 1995.

The next clue was Dave Matthews Band’s “Crash” being a favorite song among Lady Bird and her friends, was also on the radio, and was also played at prom. “Crash” was released in 1996 – again, I used to fucking LOVE Dave Matthews Band, so don’t mess with 90’s pop music here, okay? A coworker said she disagreed with me because she didn’t discover Dave Matthews until college in the early 2000s. Okay, but fact is fact. The song was popular in 1996, and yes, you COULD argue that Lady Bird lived in a small town, so things were behind the times, but the audience still needs to be given context for that, because it looks incorrect and that makes me think Gerwig doesn’t know her shit. It was bothering me the entire movie.

You know what else? I got into my car after work on Friday and was flipping through radio stations and stumbled across Sirus XM’s channel, 90’s on 9… and who was on? Gerwig! She was playing all the songs that inspired her… FROM THE 90’S. Hmm!

The other issue I had with the film was that it didn’t follow a story arc. There was no real emotional pull for Lady Bird – I didn’t really care whether she got into the school of her choice or not. There were no real stakes. We were never told what her dreams were, aside from her saying she wanted to be “a writer in the woods”. You have to care about the characters or else there’s no real point; no emotional investment.

After hearing Gerwig on the radio, where she said she grew up in 2002 in Sacramento (the same as Lady Bird), I’d venture to say this was based on her life, which is partly good and partly bad. We can be inspired by what we’ve known and what we’ve lived, but sometimes we’re really bad at telling our own stories.

At the very least, it was funny, and I enjoyed a veggie pizza and a chocolate peanut butter shake while watching, so you can’t go wrong there.

Today, I’m settling in for a cozy, yet productive weekend. And, if you’re in the mood to shop, I’m having a SALE in my Etsy Shop this weekend (15% off everything + free domestic shipping), as I’m trying to clear out my 2017 inventory and make room for 2018 goodies!

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Posted on January 13, 2018, in Light Pulp and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 3 Comments.

  1. Hi and Happy New Year – it has been awhile since I last left a comment. One of my ‘resolutions’ is to actually comment on blogs or articles of interest instead of clicking onward.. I’m glad you mentioned that you weren’t emotionally connected with Ladybird. I felt a great big lack of connection with the whole movie, especially Ladybird. Even her mom who saw everything through an imagined attached price tag was sadly stereotyped for me. Kindly dad who had personal problems as well as chronic unemployment seemed remote. I guess he vicariously escaped his own situation by funding her trip to NY. I didn’t see any dream or fight in Ladybird except to just leave home. I left home as soon as possible too though experienced no simpatico with her.

    Fortunately, my mood was lifted by watching the whole season 1 of The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel – a tonic for the soul, giggles, woo hoos, and plenty of passion fueling her growing up.Now That’s Entertainment!

    • Hey there! That’s a good goal to have this year 😁 I’m glad I’m not the only one who felt this way… a friend of mine also mentioned how unlikely the ending was, which I agree. Oohhh I’ll have to check out The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel!!

  2. Oh, yes, do download it from Amazon. You’ll go out the door swinging on Monday morning.

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